Fried Cornbread from The Old Mill

Wilderness Wildlife Week pigeon forge TN

I had a great time at Wilderness Wildlife Week in Pigeon Forge TN! I've got lots to tell you about the whole event. I met some folks who are trying to preserve the old ways of Appalachia while keeping a foot firmly planted in the present with at least one eye fixed on the future. 

One highlight of the trip for The Deer Hunter and I was getting to tour The Old Mill. I'll share the behind the scenes story of the visit in a later post, but today I want to share a recipe from The Old Mill. 

There are all sorts of vendors set up at Wilderness Wildlife Week. We visited The Old Mill booth at least once every day while we were there. Outside the LeConte Center (where Wilderness Wildlife Week was held) The Old Mill had a constant stream of tasty fried cornbread for folks to sample as they walked by. 

We've had fried cornbread before but there was just something about The Old Mill's that was so good! Maybe it was because the cornmeal was freshly ground or maybe it was because we we were doing lots of walking and had worked up a great appetite. 

One of our favorite meals to eat during the summer is a big pot of soup beans, fried taters, kill lettuce and cornbread. With our last pot of soup beans The Deer Hunter suggested I make some fried cornbread. Instead of using my old recipe I did a quick google and found the one used by The Old Mill.

Best cornmeal ground at The Old Mill in pigon forge TN

Miller’s Fried Cornbread from The Old Mill in Pigeon Forge TN

Ingredients:

2 cups OLD Mill White or Yellow Self-Rising Cornmeal
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
Canola oil or bacon drippings

Directions:

Mix cornmeal and buttermilk in a bowl until well blended. Let stand at least 10 minutes.

Heat 1/2 inch oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Drop batter, by heaping tablespoons, into hot oil; brown on both sides, reducing heat as necessary.

Makes about 14 to 16.

Fried cornbread reciepe from the old mill pigeon forge tn

As you cook the cornbread you can play around with the size of them. I found my bunch likes theirs on the small side-say about the size of a 50 cent piece or just slightly larger. The ones I made were very good although I'm not sure they're as good as the ones the fried cornbread expert working The Old Mill booth made. 

After tasting the first one Chatter said "Now that's one of the best things that's ever happened to me." I'm thinking that's pretty good praise coming from girl like her.

If you'd like try some of that fresh ground cornmeal you can order it right from home. I'm partial to white cornmeal but I'm sure everything produced by The Old Mill is great! Jump over to their website to see what's available here. I've heard their catfish breading is outstanding. 

Let me know if you like fried cornbread and be on the lookout for more about Wilderness Wildlife Week and The Old Mill right here on the Blind Pig and The Acorn.

Tipper

p.s. Up coming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • June 3, 2016 @ 7:00 p.m. John C. Campbell Folk School Brasstown, NC
  • June 4, 2016 @ TBA Art Walk Festival Murphy, NC
  • June 5, 2016 @ 10:00 a.m. Decoration Shady Grove Baptist Church Ranger, NC

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Let Us Never Forget

 

Let us never forget to honor those who gave the ultimate sacrifice serving in the Armed Forces of the United States of America so that we might be free. 

Tipper

p.s. Up coming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • June 3, 2016 @ 7:00 p.m. John C. Campbell Folk School Brasstown, NC
  • June 4, 2016 @ TBA Art Walk Festival Murphy, NC
  • June 5, 2016 @ 10:00 a.m. Decoration Shady Grove Baptist Church Ranger, NC

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Fallen Soldiers

Library of congress American Marines raising American flag on Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima, 1945

Photo from Library of Congress -
American Marines raising American flag on Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima, 1945

Memorial Day was created to honor fallen soldiers of the Civil War and was originally called Decoration Day. John L. Logan is largely responsible for organizing the day, and in 1868 declared:

The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land. In this observance no form of ceremony is prescribed, but posts and comrades will in their own way arrange such fitting services and testimonials of respect as circumstances may permit.

As time, and wars, went by people began honoring all fallen soldiers on the day no matter when or how they had served their country. In 1971 Congress officially declared Memorial Day to be an official holiday occurring on the last Monday in May to honor all who have given the ultimate sacrifice serving in the Armed Forces of The United States of America.

Pap and Paul learned the song Mansions of the Lord from the movie We Were Soldiers. The song plays as the credits roll, so a lot of folks missed the song even if they watched the movie.  We've always called the song Fallen Soldiers. It was only as I researched it's history that I learned the real title.

Mansions of the Lord (music by Nick Glennie-Smith/Words by Randall Wallace)

To fallen soldiers that are seen
Where no rockets fly nor bullets sing
Our broken brothers let us bring
To the mansions of the Lord

No more weeping of our fight
No more searching through the night
Trust in Jesus name eternal life
In the mansions of the Lord

Where no mothers cry nor children weep
We shall stand and guard though the Angles see
All through the ages bravely keep 
The mansions of the Lord
The mansions of the Lord

 


Pap raised us with a healthy dose of thankfulness for the soldiers who stood in the gap and sacrificed for our freedom. He was a Marine during the mid to late 50s so he didn't serve in a direct combat situation. He'd be the first to tell you his time in the armed services was easy compared to those who did see combat.

Pap spent a large portion of his service in South America on a ship. I have always had horrible motion sickness. Pap told me he had it too...until he was put on the first ship. He said after a few days of misery his body finally adjusted to the motion and he never had to worry about getting motion sickness again.

Since Pap's accident and heart attack last May he knew his time was drawing nigh. As the family talks about him we can all see clearly how he was completely prepared for death, but it seems he spent the last year preparing us for his death. 

A few things that happened the week before he passed make me think he knew his journey across Jordan was coming soon. He shared a memory from the Marines with Granny that none of us, including Granny, had ever heard before. 

The ship Pap was on was in a South American port. Several Marines had leave and went into town. A few of them had too much to drink, and one of them got in an argument with some of the locals. The fight escalated and the soldier ended up busting the windows out of their car. Pap told Granny some of them took up a little money and gave it to the person who owned the car so that they could fix the windows because they felt bad about it.

Granny said Pap cried as he told her the Marine that damaged the car disappeared, they never seen him again. Pap said they figured the locals killed him and maybe he asked for it, but he had always worried that a ship full of Marines might have been able to find him if they had tried. Granny said Pap also cried about a soldier that fell overboard and died during that same mission.

I believe Pap felt he had to tell Granny about the soldiers he had silently mourned for so many years before he passed away.

I'm positive the patriotism Pap instilled in each of his children and grandchildren came from his great respect to every soldier who served; especially those who perished fighting valiantly in battle and while going about their daily duties giving the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. 

Tipper

p.s. Up coming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • TODAY- May 29, 2016 @ 11:00 a.m. Valley Town Baptist Church Andrews, NC
  • June 3, 2016 @ 7:00 p.m. John C. Campbell Folk School Brasstown, NC
  • June 4, 2016 @ TBA Art Walk Festival Murphy, NC
  • June 5, 2016 @ 10:00 a.m. Decoration Shady Grove Baptist Church Ranger, NC

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May in Pigeon Roost

Appalachia in may

The 1974 Winter Edition of the Foxfire Magazine contains a compilation of newspaper articles written by Harvey Miller. At the time of the magazine's publication Miller's weekly column had been around for sixty years and was till being published in the Tri-County News located in Spruce Pine, North Carolina.

Here are a few of Miller's articles published during the month of May. I enjoyed them and hope you do too.

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I think the hills of Pigeon Roost is as good a place as any to be in the spring of the year.

I like to tap the sugar maple trees and get a good drink of maple sugar water, but people here no longer boil the maple sugar water and make sugar candy. A long time ago, people here even made maple sugar and sold it on the market.

I like to tap the wild grape vine water and use it for a hair tonic. You can keep the grape vine water three or four days without it souring. Grape vine water will make hair on your head grow real fast, they say. It will make it grow thicker, too, and it must be good for a bald spot.

I sure also like to break off the young growing, twisting twigs of the wild grape vines and chew them. They are real sour, but they make a good chew.

I like to gather sweet shrubs, called here "bubbies," and carry them awhile in my hand. Talk about a sweet-smelling odor - the bubbies really are something. They smell better than most roses. In fact, the bubbies are like a perfume and the odor will linger for a while. What the sweet shrubs or bubbies are called away from this mountain country, I do not know.

5/15/58

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Carmon Miller reported to the writer that he put a ten pound size lard bucket in a groundhog hole and he went back the next morning and found that the groundhog had cut a hole in the bottom of the bucket big enough to crawl through.

5/23/63

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Through extensive correspondence with the news writer, the late James Taylor Adams of Big Laurel, Va., this writer learned the complete details of how a dead mule managed to kick and kill the man who owned it.

In the work of loading the dead mule onto a sled so it could be hauled away from the barn pulled by a team so it could be buried and in some way in putting it on the sled, they got one of the dead mule's legs doubled up and got it in a twist. When the mule's legs pulled away to get straight like its other legs, it swung around some way and struck the man slap dab in the burr of the ear (which is said to be an easy place to get badly hurt if not fatal) and the man died right on the spot.

Rev. Harris Street of Pigeon Roost told me a story not too long ago. He said his father, Clingman Street, lived far out on towering Rich Mountain on the waters of Pigeon Roost Creek and one morning in the winter time real early, his neighbor, Charles Webb, who lived not too far down the hollow below him, came to tell him that he wanted him to go down to his barn and help him and another one of his neighbors, Charlie Barnett, lay down his dead mule so he could bury it.

Well, Mr. Street first thought that his neighbor was trying to pull a joke on him but when they went down to the old log barn, they found the mule standing in a cold open log barn stall dead as a door nail.

It took the three men to throw the mule to the ground by putting a "prize" under it with two heavy ten feet chestnut fence rails. 

Old timers remark about the words of an old song about the mule is a mule until he dies. Well, it seems that a mule is still a mule after he is dead.

5/4/67

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This is the time of the year to see ground hogs. Granny and I saw one yesterday in a garden down the road. The little bugger was standing up on his hind legs going along the garden row like he was at a buffet feast made just for him.

To read more about sweet smelling bubbies go here

Jump over to the Foxfire website and poke around. They are still publishing the magazine and those wonderful Foxfire Books too!

Tipper

p.s. Up coming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • TODAY- May 28, 2016 @ 2:00 p.m. Memorial Day Arts and Crafts Festival Blairsville, GA (inside the historic Courthouse)
  • TODAY- May 28, 2016 @ 5:15 p.m. Relay for Life Blairsville, GA Farmers Market
  • May 29, 2016 @ 11:00 a.m. Valley Town Baptist Church Andrews, NC
  • June 3, 2016 @ 7:00 p.m. John C. Campbell Folk School Brasstown, NC
  • June 4, 2016 @ TBA Art Walk Festival Murphy, NC
  • June 5, 2016 @ 10:00 a.m. Decoration Shady Grove Baptist Church Ranger, NC

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How to Root a Rose Bush Cutting

How to root a rose bush

On my 5 Things post earlier this week Cheryl Soehl asked about starting roses in her comment: 

Now, I have a question. When you "start" a rose, I am guessing this is a cutting. How do you encourage the roots -- in water? in soil?

I replied back to Cheryl and explained my old pink rose grows so wide that it is pretty easy to dig a rooted piece from around the edge to start a new plant. Granny taught me to root things in water like Cheryl mentioned-and it really does work for lots of things, but I've never tried rooting a rose cane in water. 

Blind Pig reader, Jim Casada, shared the following information for Cheryl to try.

Tipper—Although I’ve never tried it, you might want to pass on to Ms. Soehl (think that was the name) how Momma rooted roses. She would wait until a killing frost in the fall then cut decent-sized canes and (say a quarter of an inch thick) and then cut away a 6-8” section. She would put about half the cane in rich soil outside and cover it with a quart Mason jar upside down, pushing the jar maybe an inch into the ground. That’s it. She’d just let it sit there all winter and wait until early spring to watch for any sign of leaves sprouting. It was in effect a tiny greenhouse. Not every cane rooted but she had good luck.

If it is a rambling rose, and I think it is, you can also root, rather easily, by bending down a runner and covering it with 3-4 inches of dirt in the middle, leaving the cane exposed on both ends. It will root in a summer and can be cut away and transplanted after a killing frost.

If you have a different rooting method that's worked for you please leave a comment and tell us about it. 

Tipper

p.s. Up coming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • May 28, 2016 @ 2:00 p.m. Memorial Day Arts and Crafts Festival Blairsville, GA (inside the historic Courthouse)
  • May 28, 2016 @ 5:15 p.m. Relay for Life Blairsville, GA Farmers Market
  • May 29, 2016 @ 11:00 a.m. Valley Town Baptist Church Andrews, NC
  • June 3, 2016 @ 7:00 p.m. John C. Campbell Folk School Brasstown, NC
  • June 4, 2016 @ TBA Art Walk Festival Murphy, NC
  • June 5, 2016 @ 10:00 a.m. Decoration Shady Grove Baptist Church Ranger, NC

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Appalachia Through My Eyes - It's Hay Cutting Time

My life in appalachia its hay cutting time
It's hay cutting time in Southern Appalachia. Over the last two weeks I've watched the hay mature and ripen in the field and thought how beautiful it was as I drove to and fro about my day. 

Folks here usually get two cuttings of hay during the summer, if the weather shines down upon their fields in a good way they might get three cuttings. 

When Pap was a boy they cut hay by hand. He told me they only cut hay once a summer in those days because it took so long to do the work by hand. As time went by and things advanced in the mountains of western NC Pap's family used a cutting machine that was pulled by a team of horses to cut hay. Pap said when that happened they thought they had hit the big time. Cutting hay with a machine and horses was easier and it was so much faster than cutting by hand. 

A rake behind a horse was used to pile the hay and pitchforks were used to throw it on the back of a wagon. If you were lucky enough to have a big barn, Pap said you stored the hay in the loft.

Folks that didn't have a barn, would cut a small tree, four or five inches thick, and cut the limbs down to where they were short and stubby. The tree was placed in the ground and the hay was thrown around it into a pile of sorts. Pap said the hay actually lasted pretty good with the tree method, not as good as inside a barn, but good enough to provide for the animals.

Tipper

p.s. Up coming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • May 28, 2016 @ 2:00 p.m. Memorial Day Arts and Crafts Festival Blairsville, GA (inside the historic Courthouse)
  • May 28, 2016 @ 5:15 p.m. Relay for Life Blairsville, GA Farmers Market
  • May 29, 2016 @ 11:00 a.m. Valley Town Baptist Church Andrews, NC
  • June 3, 2016 @ 7:00 p.m. John C. Campbell Folk School Brasstown, NC
  • June 4, 2016 @ TBA Art Walk Festival Murphy, NC
  • June 5, 2016 @ 10:00 a.m. Decoration Shady Grove Baptist Church Ranger, NC

Appalachia Through My Eyes - A series of photographs from my life in Southern Appalachia.

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He Threw a Donnick at me!

  Donnick is an old word for a rock

dornick noun A rock or stone small enough to be thrown. 
1975 Gainer Speech Mtneer 9 = a stone small enough to b thrown. "He hit him with a dornick." 1997 Montgomery Coll. = pronounced donnick, usually thrown at livestock to make them move (Hooper).
[< Irish Gaelic dorno´g/Scottish Galic Doirneag < dorn "fist"; cf SND dornack]

Dictionary of Smoky Mountain English

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A week or so ago Jim Casada left the following comment:

Tipper--Bill B.'s usage of chunk, and someone else mentioned it as well, falls in my main linkage to the word.

I wonder if anyone among your readers is familiar with one of the things that I regularly chunked; namely, a donnick.

I heard that word used regularly as a kid, but other than personally using it in writing a few times, I don't recall encountering it in years.

A typical usage would be something like: "If you don't leave me alone I'm going to pick up the biggest donnick I can throw and chunk it at your head."

I was intrigued by Jim's comment so I looked in my dictionary and there the word donnick was! Even though the entry is spelled slightly different (see above) the definition notes it is pronounced the same as in Jim's comment. 

I have never heard the word, but The Deer Hunter said it was common when he was growing up in Haywood County NC. 

How about you-have you ever the word donnick?

Tipper

p.s. Up coming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • May 28, 2016 @ 2:00 p.m. Memorial Day Arts and Crafts Festival Blairsville, GA (inside the historic Courthouse)
  • May 28, 2016 @ 5:15 p.m. Relay for Life Blairsville, GA Farmers Market
  • May 29, 2016 @ 11:00 a.m. Valley Town Baptist Church Andrews, NC
  • June 3, 2016 @ 7:00 p.m. John C. Campbell Folk School Brasstown, NC
  • June 4, 2016 @ TBA Art Walk Festival Murphy, NC
  • June 5, 2016 @ 10:00 a.m. Decoration Shady Grove Baptist Church Ranger, NC

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5 Things

True Appalachain Men

1. These 4 men recently received a well deserved Award of Excellence for the work they do. Knowing the people they provide service for on a daily basis nominated them for the award makes it that much sweeter. Knowing every last one of them is a true Appalachian man born and raised right here in my mountains makes my heart sing. If you didn't recognize him, The Deer Hunter is the third back from the front. If I were going on an epic journey filled with great peril-these are the men I would beg to go with me. They could handle any task, chore, or issue that arose-AND they would tackle it all with an encouraging kind compassionate spirit.

In memory of Pap Wilson
2. We have been overwhelmed by the out pouring of love that has rained down upon our heads since Pap died. Hugs, love, food, cards, letters, emails, texts, flowers, donations to the JCCFS music scholarship in Pap's name, stories, kind words, books donated to libraries in Pap's name, and even rings-all given to us in memory of Pap and what he meant to the givers and to the receivers.

Pap loved the avett brothers

3. I've told you before that Pap was a fan of The Avett Brothers. He liked their music, he liked the lyrics to their songs even more. He said he didn't know about all that jumping around they do sometimes, but he sure liked how they did their own thing and still managed to make it in the music world. Pap was really pleased when he found out their uncle was his friend and fellow musician Wally from right over in Martins Creek. I never know when I'm going to bust into tears over missing Pap. The other morning on the way to work it was The Avett Brothers that caused it. As I listened to one of their songs I started thinking about what a cool old man Pap was. He not only knew who The Avett Brothers were, he could even tell you which of their songs he liked the best. I shared this one with him a few weeks before he passed. Like many of their original songs it has an old sound but with a totally modern interpretation.

Granny Gazzies Pink Rose
4. Years ago Granny gave me a start of an old fashioned pink rose she got from her mother, my Granny Gazzie. I planted it beside the driveway and fell in love with it the first spring it bloomed. The prettiest deep pink you ever seen, but even better than the color is the sweet fragrance. After a year or two I realized choosing to plant the rose by the driveway was a mistake. I had to constantly keep it pruned back out of the way. I finally wised up and started a piece of the rose near the edge of a bank on around the house where it could sprawl and grow to its heart's content. The rose only blooms once in the spring but it's worth waiting on.

Stamey creek creations unique jewelry from appalachia
5. If you haven't checked out Chitter's Stamey Creek Creations Etsy Shop lately you need to. She's added some especially interesting designs lately. I especially like the snap type clasp she's used on some of them-very easy to put on when you're in a hurry.  

Tipper

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How to Make Pickled Beets

How to make pickled beets 

The pickled beet recipe I prefer to use can be found in the Ball Blue Book of Preserving. I've tried pickled beet recipes that called for onions and other things, but they all seemed too complicated for my bunch. I've found simple is often what works best for us. 

Pickled beets recipe 
The recipe calls for 3 quarts of beets or about 24 small ones. None of the beets that we grow are ever the same size. I have gigantic beets and little bitty ones too.

I cook and peel them like Miss Cindy taught me to do years ago. It's so much easier to peel them after they're cooked.

I slice the cooked beets and then see if I have 3 quarts. Sometimes I end up with 6 quarts. If I do, I doubled the recipe and it works out perfect. *The measurements below are for a single run of pickles using 3 quarts of beets.

Old time recipe for pickled beets 

In a large stock pot combine: sugar, cinnamon, whole allspice, salt; vinegar, and water. Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes. The ball recipe says to remove the cinnamon sticks at this point, but I leave them and just make sure one doesn't go into the jars as I finish the pickles.

While the pickling mixture is simmering sterilize your jars. The Deer Hunter likes to heat his jars in the oven, I prefer to use a dishpan full of simmering water.

Best pickled beet recipe 
Pack the sliced beets into the jar;

Easy recipe for pickled beets 
Ladle hot pickling mixture in the jar leaving a 1/4 inch headspace; attach lids and rings.

Canning pickled beets 
Process pints and quarts 30 minutes in a boiling water canner.

Print Pickled Beets Recipe (right click on link to print recipe)

How to can pickled beets 

I have beets in the garden ready to pickle, I hope to accomplish that task next week sometime. Do you like pickled beets? The Deer Hunter and I love them-the girls not so much. Chatter and Chitter say pickled beets taste like dirt. I say I know they do but I still like them!

Tipper

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This Little Light of Mine

This post was originally published right here on the Blind Pig and The Acorn in 2013.

Oconaluftee church smoky mtn park

A few months back, we visited the Lufty Baptist church in the Smoky Mountain National Park. If you've been reading the Blind Pig for a while, you'll probably remember the time we hiked back to the Little Cataloochee Baptist Church (if you missed it-just click on the words in orange) 

Last fall Chatter was looking through some videos when she came across the one we filmed at Little Cataloochee. She said "You know that was one of funnest things we ever did. Didn't you say there were other churches in the park?" I told her there were other historic churches in the park and she said "Well lets go sing in another one!"

I passed Chatter's wish along to Don Casada-aka Smoky Mountain Park Expert. With Don's help we planned a trip to the historic Lufty Baptist Church.

Lufty Baptist Church

The church is located near Cherokee, NC and is easily accessible. There's a place to park within view of the church which made carrying the guitar a breeze compared to toting it back to the Little Cataloochee Baptist Church.

Smokemont Baptist Church

There's a sign at the bottom of the hill that reads Smokemont Baptist Church. One closer to the church reads Lufty Baptist Church. Don loaned me a book about the church: Ocona Lufta Baptist Pioneer Church of the Smokies 1836-1939

Ocona lufta baptist church

The morning we set out for the church was cold, but the day warmed up fast and the sun shone brightly for us. We'd been planning the trip for a few weeks. The girls knew what songs they wanted to film, but it seemed like every time they planned to practice something came up. I hoped they would at least be able to practice the night before the trip.

Unfortunately, the day before the trip ended up being filled with teenage angst. Once I realized there'd be no practicing that night either, I wondered if we should call the whole thing off, but both girls begged me not to and promised they could handle it. 

Visiting lufty baptist church

Since the church was shut up tightly and the sun didn't quite hit it, the inside was cold! Even though the sun felt warm outside you could literally see your breath inside the building.

Historic buildings in the smoky mtn park

We checked out all the cool details of the church and then it was time to get down to the business at hand.

Smokemont

After the girls changed into their performing outfits they found some flowers that had been thrown over the bank. Don said he thought someone had recently had a wedding at the church. The flowers just happen to match the girls' outfits which tickled them to death.

Smokemont nc

When the silliness finally subsided (it never goes completely away) the girls made some of the best music they've ever made. I'm not sure if they were trying to make it up to me or if it was just the perfect day for singing.

Once we had planned the trip to Lufty Baptist Church, I kept hoping a story would come to me the way the Cora Lee Mease story did when we visited Little Cataloochee Baptist Church.

No story came in the days leading up to the trip.

I looked in every nook and cranny of the church the day we were there-still no story. I thought well, it may just be about us this time.

A good while after we visited Lufty Baptist Church the story finally came. It's not anything like the Cora Lee Mease story. Actually it's more of a connection or a thought than a story.

Drop back by over the coming days for more about the church, the singing, and the story too. 

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I hope you enjoyed this re-post. The girls have been wanting to film in another historic church and I'm hoping we can make that happen sometime this summer so be on the lookout for another Pressley Girls church singing video.

Tipper

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