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December 13, 2012

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I love it when individuals come together and share views.
Great blog, keep it up!

Art isn't just drawing or painting a beautiful picture. I can't draw a straight line. Some people just have
it, like Tipper with her angels and the other crafty things. I can't draw but I can make all kinds of Cherokee beading.My mother taught me this when
I was young and this has remained with me all these years. Our two daughters can make anything and our son carves. One of our grandsons is a great artist and he will graduate this fall with his Masters.He was blessed by having good teachers who cared about him and his talent. God has blessed us with many talents and with good teachers. My grandson gives me a painting each Christmas or lets me pick which one I like. He brought me one of Tsali(Charlie) one year and he was laying stretched out dead. I told him to take it to the museum or school because I didn't
want to be remember what happened to him.I believe I couldn't sleep good.

Peggy L.


That's why I don't listen to what the world tells me-

Lest we forget, our first and best teachers were our parents, grandparents and other loving family. The vast majority of what we learn is before the age of four. That is when we learn how to learn. People who leave their children to the care of strangers at that tender age have no right to expect them to follow in their footsteps. My footsteps may not be the best to follow in but at least I have made it this far in them.

Thanks for recognizing the talents of teachers and how they interact and share their talents with their students. This was wonderful!

Tipper--Nice to recognize paragons of pedagogical prowess (that's a tribute to a 9th grade teacher, Thad DeHart, who endowed me with a lasting love for the English language). Beyond that, like Miss Cindy, far too much of what I might have to say about today's educational establishment (note that I don't say teachers, although there are problems there as well) is basically unprintable.

I look at my high school education all too many years ago and firmly believe that overall it was, never mind inferior materials and a county with little money, far superior to that of today. I had some indifferent teachers, but in Swain County as well as college, I also had some truly inspirational ones.

Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

Tipper,
Although I can't do drawings and
such, some of the things I can do
may be art work, and I give great
credit for the teachers in my life. To me, they're right there
with "the greatest generation", our veterans...Ken

Tipper,
That was what I was trying to express in my comments yesterday...
I really think art is in the eye of the viewer...and everyone has art and creativity in their soul..
Sometimes it takes a little push to get started...Just one little memory of a way you were taught to do something, will help you in later life...even it is just helping your own children with homework, painting a room, or organizinge a garden in a pleasing composition...
Thanks Tipper, Tell your Mr. Art Teacher, that I appreciate his dedication to his work...encouraging students to work from the right side of the brain as well as the left!

Teachers are the greatest and have always been my heroes!!

When we think back on our school days, it seems that everyone had a teacher that uplifted our spirits and were so encouraging. Those students are so fortunate to have Mr. Art Teacher. Those examples of art on the wall says it all! His expertise is reflected in the students' work.

Art class was always my favorite and I was blessed with some really good art teachers. Looks like your community has a good art teacher also. I didn't get to read yesterdays post until today and I wanted to tell you that your tree is lovely. I bet you and your girls are true artists.

There persists,still,many misconceptions and stereotypes--both good and bad,both accurate & erroneous,about Appalachia.

Some of my fondest memories will always be the ones I spent with an artist named Margo Bell. She taught private lessons from an old stand alone garage. We spent hours drawing and painting water colors of her Mothers zinnias, scenes of Blue Lake, the old post office and anything else we happened to see like her old 1958 pick up truck. She took us everywhere to set up and spend long afternoons learning how to draw everything she could think of. I never was very good at 2 dimensional work, but I later became a sculptor of some skill. I am pleased to say that she has returned to my hometown and continues teaching and loving her students as in the past. Some really great artists taught me over the years, but Margo taught me how to "see" and love art.

Yes, Tipper, sounds like a good man, a good teacher. There are good teachers but they are hobbled be the system....and that's all I'm going to say about that, though I have lot's more opinion on it. lol

There are also some very good kids out there and they need all the encouragement they can get.
Bless Mr Art Teacher!

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