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August 08, 2014

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I knew about the flowers being edible, but not the leaves - good news! There are many varieties of wild violets in my neck of the woods. Maybe I'll make some tea or add some leaves to a salad today.

I hope Garland Davis is OK out there in Hawaii!

Interesting information,, I did'nt know this.. ..

In my experience the top ranked posts wouldn't include popular at all. Popular won't last more than a year or two. Even pine is better than popular. Locust is best if you can find it. What you fencing in anyway? You getting a cow? 10 posts won't make much of a pasture.

Tipper,
I have no doubt that violet remedies work, but I've never tried any of them. Perhaps the Good Lord put cures and remedies all over the Earth in the most simple forms. Most come right from the ground like we did, we just have to look for 'em...Ken

The only other members of the Viola family I know about are the violin (fiddle), cello and double bass. None of them are edible although the sounds they sometimes produce could be called medicinal. Pretty pictures though!

How do we be sure we're picking a violet? What flowers might be confused for violets? If anyone can help with these questions, I'd appreciate it.

I made the Violet Jelly twice last year. The kids loved it! Until you posted the recipe, I didn't know the pretty little flowers were good for anything except 'rooster' fighting.

This is a good refresher for something rather unique in its usefulness. Happy violet hunting that hasn't been sprayed by anything.

WONDERFUL! I have a gracious plenty! They grow better than anything else in our yard. Neighbors pull them as weeds, but I can't bring myself to do that. Those pretty purple flowers signal spring here in Michigan. Now, I can rightly say that I'm gardening FOR my violets!

Nice information. I would try this if they grew near me. Some of our Indian lore here in FL comes from the Cherokee when they fled the area, they settled here.

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