I'm Giving Away a Rooster!

MOMMYgooseANDfriends

This is my third post about Mike Norris and his book Mommy Goose Rhymes from the Mountains. I'm a fan of the book if you haven't figured that out by now. It is filled with 50 original rhymes written by Mike himself. The book uses the rich colorful Appalachian Language that I so love. 

It is wonderfully illustrated with photos of over a hundred hand carved and painted works by Minnie Adkins who has permanent collections in the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Gallery of Art, and the Kentucky Folk Art Center.

Here are two poems from the book-the first of which is very appropriate for today's giveaway.

THE ROOSTER

The rooster started pecking at Granpaw’s legs,
Then tried to flog Granmaw as she gathered eggs.
Granmaw boiled water,
While I churned butter.
The next night we had fried chicken for supper.

--------------------------

BENJAMIN GRIMES

Benjamin Grimes
Went down in the mines,
But only lasted three days.
The note from the clerk
Said, "Unwilling to work,"
But Ben said it wasn't that way.

"Had nary a trouble
With pick or shovel
Till something come up grey.
Not a loafer or shirker,
But one thing for certain,
I'd druther draw breath than pay."

I especially enjoyed the first poem because of a story my friend, Trevis, told me.

When Trevis was a little boy he stayed with his grandmother during the day while his momma worked. Every morning he'd walk to the barn with his Mamaw to feed the chickens and take care of the other chores after his grandfather had left for work. He said one morning his Papaw's favorite rooster attacked Mamaw. Before Trevis knew what happened Mamaw had reached down and taken care of Mr. Rooster-in other words he'd never attack anyone again. That night they had the chicken for supper and Papaw didn't know he was eating his favorite rooster till later! Trevis said his Papaw was mad, but his Mamaw said she was tired of that mean ole rooster bothering her.

In addition, you can purchase a cd of the book which contains a song Mike wrote about Mommy Goose. The song, along with the music, is in the back of the book so anyone interested can learn it themselves. The cd also contains a very nice narration of the book by Mike and a conversation between Mike and Minnie that will leave you smiling for the rest of the day. 

I asked Mike where the best place to purchase the book and the cd was and this is what he said:

The Mommy Goose: Rhymes from the Mountains CD is now available on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, Google Music, and a bunch more places online. Check it out on iTunes and listen to samples of the tracks here: 
http://itunes.apple.com/album/id1160037010?ls=1&app=itunes

If you have the book without the CD, it's really not complete, as the song, narration, and 40-plus minute conversation with Minnie are a key part of the project. (And physical CDs can be ordered from Amazon.)

Bookstore versions of the book may be ordered many places online, but Amazon and The University Press of Ky [it's the university press of the whole state, not just UK] are two good sources.

Minnie Adkins - Blue Rooster

If there is a child in your life or a rhyme loving adult like me, I suggest you buy Mike's outstanding book and cd for them. Both items would make dandy Christmas presents. Preserving our language is a cause that is near and dear to my heart and I commend Mike for trying to keep our rich colorful Appalachian Language alive. 

Minnie generously donated one of her Blue Roosters for me to giveaway as part of my Thankful November Series. Minnie Adkins is a featured artist in the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Gallery of Art, and the Kentucky Folk Art Center.

Leave a comment on this post for a chance to win the Rooster. *Giveaway ends Saturday December 3, 2016.

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Chitter has extended her Holiday Sale over in her Stamey Creek Creations Shop: Use coupon code: HOLIDAYS4 for 25% off on ANYTHING in the shop, including items in my free shipping sale section--!!

In addition Items that say BLACK FRIDAY SALE have been discounted and are also eligible for my 25% off coupon!

Tipper

p.s. Today is the last day to enter the giveaway for Pap and Paul's Songs of Christmas CD-go here to enter.

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Mommy Fell and a Giveaway

Mommy Goose Rhymes from the Mountains by Mike Norris

Back in September I told you about Mike Norris and his book Mommy Goose Rhymes from the Mountains. It is filled with 50 original rhymes written by Mike himself. The book uses the rich colorful Appalachian Language that I so love. 

It is wonderfully illustrated with photos of over a hundred hand carved and painted works by Minnie Adkins who has permanent collections in the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Gallery of Art, and the Kentucky Folk Art Center.

Two months later I'm still enjoying the rhymes in the book. Granny and I had a great time reading it together the other day. Here's one of my favorites from the book-Granny liked it too. 

Mommy Fell

When Mommy fell out of the apple tree,
She got right up and went on a spree.
She danced a jig on the featherbed,
Then baked two bushels of gingerbread.
She used our tablecloth for a cape,
And made a necklace with measuring tape.
She tried to crochet with her feet,
Way up in the night before she fell asleep.


She stomped in the kitchen next morning and said,


"Who tracked mud all over my bed?
Why, look at the floor, covered with crumbs.
And where did all this gingerbread come from?
I don't know who I have to thank
For being so pyert as to pull such a prank,
But I'll find out before the day's through,
And they'll be in big trouble when I do!"

Granny said the rhyme reminded her of her mother Gazzie. She said "Momma worked so hard from daylight to dark every day that she couldn't even remember all the things she did in a day. Now if I could crotchet with my hands and my feet there's no telling what I'd make!"

There's a cd of the book which contains a song Mike wrote about Mommy Goose. The song, along with the music, is in the back of the book so anyone interested can learn it themselves. The cd also contains a very nice narration of the book by Mike and a conversation between Mike and Minnie that will leave you smiling for the rest of the day. Me missing Pap is no secret to any of you. Hearing Minnie's sweet voice use so many of the words, sayings, and phrases Pap used has been a true balm for my soul.

I asked Mike where the best place to purchase the book and the cd was and this is what he said:

The Mommy Goose: Rhymes from the Mountains CD is now available on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, Google Music, and a bunch more places online. Check it out on iTunes and listen to samples of the tracks here: 
http://itunes.apple.com/album/id1160037010?ls=1&app=itunes

If you have the book without the CD, it's really not complete, as the song, narration, and 40-plus minute conversation with Minnie are a key part of the project. (And physical CDs can be ordered from Amazon.)

Bookstore versions of the book may be ordered many places online, but Amazon and The University Press of Ky [it's the university press of the whole state, not just UK] are two good sources.

 

If there is a child in your life or a rhyme loving adult like me, I suggest you buy Mike's outstanding book and cd for them. Both items would make dandy Christmas presents. 

Preserving our language is a cause that is near and dear to my heart and I commend Mike for trying to keep our rich colorful Appalachian Language alive. 

Mike generously donated a copy of the cd for me to giveaway as part of my Thankful November Series. Leave a comment on this post for a chance to win the cd. *Giveaway ends Saturday November 26.

Be on the lookout for one more giveaway related to the book-it's a good one!

Tipper

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Appalachian Vocabulary Test 94

Words still commonly used in appalachia from england scotland ireland

It's time for this month's Appalachian Vocabulary Test. 

I'm sharing a few videos to let you hear some of the words. To start the videos, click on them and then to stop them click on them again. 

Take it and see how you do! 

1. Galacker: one who gathers galax to sell. "Mommy said when she was young they would go galacking every fall to make spending money to buy Christmas presents."

 

A video posted by Tipper (@blindpigandacorn) on

 

2. Gald: to chaf or burn; to inflame one's anger. "Every time we plan something she promises to be there to help and the fact that she never not once shows up galds my hide!" or "His arm was galded something awful from where he spilt the boiling water." 

 

A video posted by Tipper (@blindpigandacorn) on

 

3. Gom: to make a mess. "When Chatter and Chitter were little they lived to gom. Give them a bucket of water and a dirty spot in the yard and they were in heaven."

 

A video posted by Tipper (@blindpigandacorn) on

 

4. Gob: a large amount. "They had gobs of pumpkins down at the store and they were just giving them away. I wish I had got a few more.

5. Goody: a nut kernel. "Granny is so patient. She'll work five minutes trying to get the goody out of one black walnut."

All of this month's words are beyond common in my area of Appalachia excpet galacker. In fact the others are so common I'd guess most everyone will know them.

Tipper

p.s. On Saturday November 19 the Fontana Regional Library will be hosting the first “Read Local” book signing in Bryson City  at the Marianna Black Library from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. More than a dozen authors and researches with Bryson City/Swain County roots or connections will be offering their books for sale with a portion of the proceeds going towards construction of a new Marianna Black Library. Both Jim and Don Casada will be featured at the event-so go out and see them if you can!

p.s.s.  The Pressley Girls  will be playing this Saturday November 19, 2016 @ 1:30 p.m. - Marble Elementary Fall Festival in Marble, NC.

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Foundered

  Foundered on turkey

founder noun To become ill from overeating.
Same as flounder.
1942 Chase Jack Tales 5 Well, Jack eat about all the dinner he could hold, but the King's old woman kept on pilin' up his plate till he was foundered. 1975 GSMNP-59:10 He'd get in the corn or something like that and eat too much and founder him, make him sick and possible kill him . . . A mule, you can't founder them by eating. 1990 Fisher Preacher Stories 25 An animal such as a cow or hog or horse is said to be foundered if it eats too much. At times the term is applied humorously to human beings. 

Dictionary of Smoky Mountain English

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A few weeks ago Ethelene Dyer left this comment:

Did any of you ever get "foundered" at dinner on the Grounds? Tipper that's a word for your Appalachian vocabulary test!  I think instead of giving the definition, I will see who knows what  "foundered" means!

Like me, several of you know what the word foundered means. It's a word I've heard my entire life and still hear on a regular basis. If there's ever a time of the year to founder yourself its during Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Tipper 

p.s. On Saturday November 19 the Fontana Regional Library will be hosting the first “Read Local” book signing in Bryson City  at the Marianna Black Library from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. More than a dozen authors and researches with Bryson City/Swain County roots or connections will be offering their books for sale with a portion of the proceeds going towards construction of a new Marianna Black Library. Both Jim and Don Casada will be featured at the event-so go out and see them if you can!

p.s.s.  The Pressley Girls will be playing Saturday November 19, 2016 @ 1:30 p.m. at the Marble Elementary Fall Festival Marble, NC.

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Come, Eat, Give, Run - Word Usage

Why do people in the south talk funny 

When you were in elementary school did you learn about the tenses of words-you know the present, past, and past participle? My OCD side enjoyed putting the right tense of a word in the right column on the page the teacher gave out as an assignment. 

While I made good grades on those word worksheets, I sure wouldn't have got a good grade if my speech was tested. I still wouldn't.

In Appalachia we do all sorts of crazy things with the present-past-past participle tense of words. Who knows how many we change in our speech, but today I'm going to concentrate on 4 words. 

  1. Come: instead of the correct come, came, come usage in Appalachia is often come, come, come. "Yesterday I come by to see you but they said you was already gone."
  2. Eat: instead of the correct eat, ate, eaten it is often eat, eat, eat. "For Martha's birthday last month, we eat the best supper. We had fried taters, soup beans, cornbread and fresh kill lettuce from the garden."
  3. Give: instead of give, gave, given it is often give, give, give. "I just give you 10 dollars at the beginning of the week and you've already done spent it?"
  4. Run: instead of run, ran, run  it is often run, run, run. "Yesterday I run over to Walmarts-I guess that's where I was when you come by."

I'm guilty of all the examples above. I've found when I'm writing I'm more likely to use the correct tense, but when I'm talking, forget about it-I'm never going to get it right. 

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The winner of the Lamp Lighting Time cd is...Steve in TN who said: One of my favorite songs. Tells a sad but hopeful story. A perfect fit for the blind pig musicians.

Today is the last day to enter the giveaway for the book Heirloom Plants so go enter if you haven't!

Tipper

p.s. Remember Guitar Man? For those of you who don't he is my oldest nephew. He shows up in most of our oldest music videos. He's making a movie! Actually he and a group of friends are trying their best to make a movie-go here for all the details. 

p.s.s. A few upcoming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • TODAY Saturday November 12, 2016 @ 7:15 p.m.- Brasstown Community Center Brasstown, NC (the girls will be clogging at 6:15 with the Kudzu Kickers if you want to come early!)
  • Saturday November 19, 2016 @ 1:30 p.m. - Marble Elementary Fall Festival Marble, NC

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Pine Rosin

Tipper Chatter and Chitter
Chatter, Tipper, and Chitter 

Over the years I've learned to be wary when one of the girls run up to me holding out her hand telling me to look and see what she found. One time it was a handful of hairless baby mice another it was the entrails of a recently butchered deer. 

Pine rosin in appalachia

So a few weeks ago when Chitter held out her hand and said "You'll never believe what I found-here touch it." I said "Gross get that away from me...well what is it?" Chitter said "Good grief it's only pine rosin. I've just never seen a glob this big before have you?"

After I realized the glob wasn't alive nor an animal by-product I took the pine rosin and inhaled deeply. I was immediately taken back to the two towering pine trees that stood above Granny and Pap's house when I was little girl. Their soft shady needled padded roots were my favorite place to play.

I never managed to come away from my play house under the pines without at least one sticky place on my clothes or fingers from the pine rosin that dripped down the massive trunks. 

Pap told me folks used to chew pine rosin in place of chewing gum. I said "Was it good?" He said "Well it was good only if you didn't have anything else, but no I wouldn't ever turn down a piece of juicy fruit in favor of it."

Appalachian writer John Parris wrote a piece about his Grandfather chewing pine rosin-here's a quote from it.

"The Old Man paused. A smile played about the corners of his mouth. There was a twinkle in his eyes. The kind of a twinkle that belongs to a little boy, but rare in the eyes of a 98-year-old. 

"Law me, what I wouldn't give to go gummin' and get a wad of pine chewin' gum," he said. "Best tastin' stuff in the world. But I don't reckeon I could do much good at chewin' resin gum with store-bought teeth. They wasn't made for it. And pine resin gum is might tough.

But when I was a boy, I chewed a lot. That I did. Most everybody chewed gum then. Same as they do now. Only it wasn't like the chewin' gum you buy. The kind we had was better than any storebought chewin' gum that was ever manufactured.

"Oh, the times we boys had goin' gummin'. It were a frolic. That it was. A springtime frolic. Spring was the only time you could go gummin'."

A lot of prepper and foraging type websites list additional uses for pine rosin. I've never chewed it or used it for anything else, but I can sure see how it might make a dandy glue! 

I asked Chitter what she was going to do with her pine rosin she said she wasn't quite sure but she'd think of something. 

Tipper

*Source: My Mountains My People by John Parris. 

p.s. Remember Guitar Man? For those of you who don't he is my oldest nephew. He shows up in most of our oldest music videos. He's making a movie! Actually he and a group of friends are trying their best to make a movie-go here for all the details. 

p.s.s. A few upcoming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • Saturday November 12, 2016 @ 7:15 p.m.- Brasstown Community Center Brasstown, NC (the girls will be clogging at 6:15 with the Kudzu Kickers if you want to come early!)
  • Saturday November 19, 2016 @ 1:30 p.m. - Marble Elementary Fall Festival Marble, NC

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Common World Sayings in Appalachia

Saying about the world 

Back in the day when The Deer Hunter and I were courting, he teased me for saying the phrase every day of the world like this: "He thinks he has to call her every day of the world and make sure she's o.k."

One day he said "What does that even mean?" I said "It means every day of the world what do you think it means!"


A few other world sayings:

  • Dead to the world: being deeply asleep. "I reckon I was dead to the world I didn't hear the storm at all." I say this one too. I sleep dead to the world every night and The Deer Hunter wishes he did.
  • What in the world/Why in the world: disbelief, surprise. "Why in the world did you erase the message David Grier left me? I wanted to keep that FOREVER!" 
  • Wouldn't take the world for: valuing something/someone. "I wouldn't take the world and it's riches for my Daddy."
  • If the world ends/the world may end: why do something or why not do something when life as we know it may soon be over. "I'm tired of worrying about how Gerlene's going to fix this mess before next week. You never know the world may end tomorrow and it wouldn't matter no how."
  • Worldly: used in a derogatory way. "Why children today worry too much about worldly goods instead of worrying about their neighbor in need."
  • The World is my oyster: all the good opportunities of the world are yours for the taking. "After I got my first job with Ritter I felt like the world was my oyster."
  • The weight of the world: being worried. "With his wife sick and then loosing his job he looked like he was a carrying the weight of the world."
  • In your own world: "Oh he's sitting in there in his chair reading a book. Once he starts reading he's in his own little world. You'll have to tell him you're here before he notices you."

Eventually The Deer Hunter quit teasing me for saying every day of the world and started saying it himself. What about you-do you say any of the world sayings? Do you have another one to add to the list?

Tipper

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Appalachian Sayings - It'll Put Hair On Your Chest

It'll put hair on your chest

Hiking up and down steep mountains will put hair on your chest. It'll also make you take naps in the leaves.

put hair on your chest = make you stronger

Tipper

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Halloween Rhyme from Appalachia

Mommy Goose Rhymes from the Mountains by Mike Norris

HALLOWEEN RHYME written by Mike Norris

Billy stuffed the witch’s mailbox with hay,
And threw rocks at her cat.
Then he laughed and ran away.
He ought not to’ve done such as that.

In the night he dreamed an awful dream,
That his feet got sealed up in a coal seam.
Then the witch came whispering in his ear:

“This is what happens if it happens twice, dear.
You’ll catch measles on top of mumps,
And sleep locked up in a army trunk.
I’ll make your little dog disappear,
And coat your tongue with boils and blisters.
I’ll trim your ears with pinking shears,
And you’ll go to live with my twin sister.”

Billy woke up a brand new boy.
He said “please” and “thank you” and shared his toys.
Later, in the yearbook, his eyes looked glazed.
The teacher wrote, “Nervous, but well behaved.”

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I hope you enjoyed Mike's Halloween Rhyme as much as I did! And if you did-then you must check out Mike's book Rhymes from the Mountains.

Although the Halloween Rhyme isn't in the book, it is chock full of wonderful original rhymes which feature our colorful vibrant Appalachian Language. To find our more about Mike go here

Tipper

p.s. Remember Guitar Man? For those of you who don't he is my oldest nephew. He shows up in most of our oldest music videos. He's making a movie! Actually he and a group of friends are trying their best to make a movie-go here for all the details. 

p.s.s. A few upcoming performances for The Pressley Girls 

  • Thursday October 27, 2016 @ 1:00 p.m. Wofford College Spartanburg, SC
  • Saturday November 12, 2016 @ TBA - Brasstown Community Center Brasstown, NC

  • Saturday November 19, 2016 @ 1:30 p.m. - Marble Elementary Fall Festival Marble, NC

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Appalachian Vocabulary Test 93

Unusual words used in western nc and eastern tn

It's time for this month's Appalachian Vocabulary Test. 

I'm sharing a few videos to let you hear some of the words too. To start the videos, click on them and then to stop them click on them again. 

Take it and see how you do! 

1. Fall out: to have a disagreement. "I reckon they had a falling out over the ball team. They've been coaching together for years now they won't even speak to each other."

2. Faired off: weather changing to clear skies. "I was worried about her wedding getting rained out but it faired off and the weather was right nice for the ceremony and the eating too."

 

A video posted by Tipper (@blindpigandacorn) on

3. Fall off: loosing weight from sickness or a worsening  condition. "I hardly knew her when I ran into her at the store the other day. She's fell off something terrible."

 

A video posted by Tipper (@blindpigandacorn) on

4. Fitten: suitable. "I don't care what you say! It just ain't fitten for a man that age to be running around acting like hes one of the teenagers."

 

A video posted by Tipper (@blindpigandacorn) on

5. Fainty: feeling weak or faint. "It's been so hot during the last week I felt plumb fainty while I was working outside. It orta be cooling off by now."

All of this month's words are still very common in southern Appalachia. I think most of them are common beyond this region as well. Hope you'll leave me a comment and let me know how you did on the test.

Tipper

p.s. Remember Guitar Man? For those of you who don't he is my oldest nephew. He shows up in most of our oldest music videos. He's making a movie! Actually he and a group of friends are trying their best to make a movie-go here for all the details. 

p.s.s. A few upcoming performances for The Pressley Girls 

October 22, 2016 @ 2:00 p.m. Cherokee County Fair Murphy, NC

October 27, 2016 @ 1:00 p.m. Wofford College Spartanburg, SC

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